<div dir="ltr"><div>They're giving him airtime because he's Richard Stallman <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman</a></div><div><br></div><div>He started GNU, the concept of copyleft, and the Free Software Foundation. He talks a lot about the distinction between free software and open source software, and his argument that free¬†software is a moral imperative. Every now and then people ask him to extend his argument to hardware and this article is interesting because it looks like his perspective has evolved a bit. </div><div><br></div><div>It seems unlikely that he'd reach out to the open source hardware community because he doesn't think open source hardware is really relevant to what he's doing (free software). <br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Mar 19, 2015 at 9:52 AM, Nancy Ouyang <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:nancy.ouyang@gmail.com" target="_blank">nancy.ouyang@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid"><div dir="ltr">Why... why is WIRED giving airtime to this rms crank who can't even be bothered to reach out to the entire open source hardware community on this list (prior art, please) or mention the hard work done by OSHWA / Alicia Gibbs / other folks?<div><br></div><div>--Nancy, semi-seriously, I realize rms is a Big Deal, but really? Wired is going to promulgate rms on this "free hardware" term when we've already standardized around open source hardware? I hope at least this wasn't published in the print magazine, or else I'm going to start picking a fight with rms and that's going to be a drastic waste of everyone's time, lol.</div></div></blockquote></div></div></div>