[Discuss] discuss Digest, Vol 9, Issue 29

malcolm stanley a.malcolm.stanley at gmail.com
Thu Feb 28 23:37:52 UTC 2013


many businesses *could* produce the designs, but may gain efficiencies and
other benefits from not having to.
This is enabled by freedom from liability concerns.

so no, I argue they are not the same as one is a benefit probably bounded
by capability, while the other is a benefit probably bounded by perceived
risk.

_________________________________________
malcolm stanley

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Read my blog at http://soaringhorse.blogspot.com
_________________________________________


On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 6:34 PM, Tom Igoe <tom.igoe at gmail.com> wrote:

> And that's the same need for businesses, no?
>
> t.
>
> On Feb 28, 2013, at 6:34 PM, malcolm stanley wrote:
>
> A primary need of individuals is access to designs and other intellectual
> property which they are not capable of producing on their own, to use as a
> catalyst and a crutch for their own activities.
>
> _________________________________________
> malcolm stanley
>
> google.voice:  215.821.6252
> Cell: 267.251.9479   <------------- new
> email: a.malcolm.stanley at gmail.com
> twitter / linkedin: amstanley
> Read my blog at http://soaringhorse.blogspot.com
> _________________________________________
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 6:28 PM, Tom Igoe <tom.igoe at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Can you clarify this a bit Matt?
>>
>>
>> On Feb 28, 2013, at 5:39 PM, Matt Maier wrote:
>>
>> For one standard to catch on it would have to be valuable to an awful lot
>> of different entities with different goals and different contexts. I
>> suspect that's not going to happen. Why? Because...
>>
>>
>>>
>>> It's clear that the needs of businesses are different than the needs of
>>> individuals, and I think most of the resultant thread(s) are on their way
>>> to establishing what businesses can do.
>>>
>>> Cameron
>>>
>> ...of this question. We've already identified two groups with obviously
>> different needs. Businesses have to pull in at least enough money to cover
>> their costs and risks; individuals don't.
>>
>>
>> What *do* individuals need?  The minute you  start selling something, you
>> face the same risks and liabilities and opportunities as any other
>> business,  Even if you put something out there publicly for someone else to
>> use, you face the liabilities, unless you state the conditions under which
>> you approve use of your design, and the limit of your responsibilities for
>> that use.
>>
>> Ideally, I'd like to see a definition *and* legal instruments that
>> support individuals who choose to do either of these things (publish and
>> sell, or publish and not sell), so that they have access to the same
>> privileges and protections as any size business.
>>
>> The need to generate a certain level of profit has to override other
>> priorities. If it doesn't the business will simply disappear. If being
>> "totally open" conflicts with "minimally profitable" then profit will have
>> to win. Individuals can try to coerce and encourage businesses to be as
>> open as possible, but at the end of the day their priorities are
>> fundamentally different.
>>
>>
>> So what are individuals' priorities and needs in an OSHW definition? What
>> will an individual use it for, other than debate?
>>
>> t.
>>
>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
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